Grace Greater Than Our Sin

skyline-drive-in-autumn

by Julia H. Johnston (1911)

Marvelous grace of our loving Lord,
Grace that exceeds our sin and our guilt,
Yonder on Calvary’s mount out-poured,
There where the blood of the Lamb was spilt.

Refrain:
Grace, grace, God’s grace,
Grace that will pardon and cleanse within;
Grace, grace, God’s grace,
Grace that is greater than all our sin.

Dark is the stain that we cannot hide,
What can avail to wash it away!
Look! there is flowing a crimson tide;
Whiter than snow you may be today. [Refrain]

Marvelous, infinite, matchless grace,
Freely bestowed on all who believe;
You that are longing to see his face,
Will you this moment his grace receive? [Refrain] Continue reading

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Pedestrian

Today I learned a new word—or rather, a new use for an old word—pedestrian. This just happens to be the current photo prompt of the week, and so it has captured my attention for a moment. Prior to inquiring about the prompt, I only knew pedestrian as a noun, “a person who moves about on foot.” But when used as an adjective, this same word means “lacking inspiration or excitement; dull.” Imagine that! Synonyms for pedestrian as an adjective are boring, tedious, monotonous, unremarkable, commonplace, ordinary, run-of-the-mill, plain-vanilla. As you can see, I’m having fun with this. But now it’s time to add some photos.

James River Foot Bridge

James River Foot Bridge, Virginia, 2008

This was this photo that immediately came to mind when I saw the prompt. Back in 2008, my children and I spent four days traveling the Blue Ridge Parkway, staying in primitive campgrounds, hiking trails, stopping at overlooks, and observing God’s creatures big and small. There were certain specific destinations that I had in mind, and the James River Foot Bridge was one of them. This bridge, located in Snowden, Virginia, is a part of the Appalachian Trail, and allows trekkers to cross the James River while avoiding the traffic of US 501. It was built on abandoned train tresses when the train track was rerouted and opened for hikers in 2000. While it is designed for pedestrians, the bridge is actually named after the man who spearheaded its conversion, Appalachian Trail enthusiast Bill Foot. This bridge, and the story behind it, are anything but pedestrian!

In fact, I’ve been hard pressed to think of anything I’ve already photographed that fits the description of dull, boring, and tedious. Perhaps that’s because I’m so easily impressed. I tend to be fascinated by little things and often want to stop the car to take a picture of this, that, or the other thing. So I think I’ll just stick with the noun form of the word pedestrian and show you a few more foot bridges that I’ve seen over the years.

Massanutten Storybook Trail Bridge 1

Massanutten Storybook Trail Bridge, Virginia, 2014

Waller Mill Park (2)

Waller Mill Park Bridge, Williamsburg, Virginia, 2014

Waller Mill Park (3)

Waller Mill Park Bridge, another view, 2014

A bridge is a passage from one side to another, crossing a body of water or some other substance that would otherwise be difficult if not impossible to cross. Sometimes there are other ways. You could swim, take a boat, or fly. But none of those options are as convenient as walking across a bridge.

There is another bridge across another chasm. This one is the ONLY way across. I’m talking about the way to heaven, and the bridge is the cross of the Lord Jesus Christ. Jesus said,

I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man comes to the Father, but by Me (John 14:6).

If there were any other way to come to God, then He would not have made His Son suffer the shame of the cross. But He did suffer that shame. He came to this earth, lived with us for thirty-three years, then paid the debt of our sins, though He Himself never committed any sin. And three days later He did what no one else ever did—He rose up from the dead of His own power. He is the victor over sin and death. That is how He can offer eternal life to you and me, because He already claimed it!

Then once you have come to the cross and your sins have been forgiven, then God shows you the way that you should go.

I am a pedestrian, slowly traveling through this world on my way to the next, and God directs every step.

Psalm 143:8 Cause me to hear Your loving-kindness in the morning; for in You do I trust: cause me to know the way wherein I should walk; for I lift up my soul unto You.

Jeremiah 6:16 Stand in the ways, and see, and ask for the old paths, where is the good way, and walk in it, and you shall find rest for your souls.

Isaiah 30:21 And your ears shall hear a word behind you, saying, “This is the way, walk in it,” when you turn to the right hand, and when you turn to the left.

Proverbs 3:5-6 Trust in the LORD with all your heart; and lean not unto your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge Him, and He shall direct your paths.

 

Weeping Will Not Save Me

Weeping

by Robert Lowry

Weeping will not save me—
Though my face were bathed in tears,
That could not allay my fears,
Could not wash the sins of years—
Weeping will not save me.

Refrain:
Jesus wept and died for me;
Jesus suffered on the tree;
Jesus waits to make me free,
He alone can save me.

Working will not save me—
Purest deeds that I can do,
Holiest thoughts and feelings too,
Cannot form my soul anew—
Working will not save me.

Waiting will not save me—
Helpless, guilty, lost I lie
In my ear is mercy’s cry;
If I wail, I can but die—
Waiting will not save me.

Faith in Christ will save me—
Let me trust thy weeping Son,
Trust the work that He has done;
To his arms, Lord, help me run—
Faith in Christ will save me.


This song came to my attention while I was preparing my article about “Nothing but the Blood.” The song was listed among Robert Lowry’s most popular hymns, but I had never heard of it. Even so, the title intrigued me enough to want to look it up and learn more. After reading it, I can see why it was a popular hymn. The message of salvation is crystal clear, and the words are very singable.

You can read Robert Lowry’s biography here, and below is an instrumental recording of the tune with the lyrics subbed on the video, just in case you’re curious enough to want to know how the song was sung.

Photo courtesy of Pixabay