Morning Mist

This is one of my favorite photos from a mountain retreat my middle child and I took the fall of 2014. It was a rather stressful time for both of us, but since we were homeschooling and had the freedom for a spur-of-the-moment excursion, we jumped in the minivan and drove three hours to a KOA cabin in the Shenandoah Valley, not far from Skyline Drive. It was a very relaxing time for both of us. We did some things together, and other things on our own, and we took turns choosing our together-activities. I won’t say we are inseparably close today, but there was some bonding formed as a result of our long-weekend getaway.

To capture this photo, I had to rise before dawn and drive for about an hour. Needless to say, this was one of my solo activities, as my son is not fond of rising before the sun, unless it’s to go hunting. To be honest, neither am I. Perhaps that’s why I like the photo so much—because it’s a rare one for me, and it required a certain degree of effort to obtain.

virginia-mountain-sunrise-mist

Weekly Photo Challenge: Elemental—Earth, Water, Fire, and Air. Continue reading

Damaris: A Little Woman with Great Faith

shore-bird-floridaDamaris is only mentioned once in the Bible.

But certain men joined unto him, and believed: among the which was Dionysius the Areopagite, and a woman named Damaris, and others with them. —Acts 17:34

In this passage, Paul has just finished preaching his famous sermon on Mars’ Hill in Athens, Greece. He made quite a stir by the things that he said. Some of those who stood by and listened were not convinced, but were willing to talk to him again later. Others, however, believed on the Lord Jesus Christ as a result of Paul’s preaching. Among them was this woman named Damaris. Her name means “a little woman,” and it can also mean “gentle,” as it is probably derived from the Greek damazo, meaning “tame.” Some suppose her to be the wife of Dionysius, but it seems as though that would have been mentioned if it were true. Others suppose her to be his disciple.

So, honestly, the only thing we know for sure is that she was present to hear Paul preach at Mars’ Hill, and she trusted in Christ for salvation by faith. That she is mentioned by name probably suggests that she was a significant woman in the community. For that matter, the fact that she was present at the Areopagus is significant, for it would have been quite rare for a woman to be there. Either she was of high social status, or she was a foreigner, or perhaps she was an educated woman. This third point would make sense if she were indeed a disciple of Dionysius.

One thing is sure, it is an honor to have one’s name recorded in the Holy Bible, but the greater honor by far is to have one’s name written in the Lamb’s Book of Life. Damaris had her name recorded in both places because she put her faith in Christ. The canon of Scripture is complete, but the Lamb’s Book of Life is not. Is your name in it?

Next week: Rhoda

Photo taken in Pensacola, Florida, 2017

Weeping Will Not Save Me

Weeping

by Robert Lowry

Weeping will not save me—
Though my face were bathed in tears,
That could not allay my fears,
Could not wash the sins of years—
Weeping will not save me.

Refrain:
Jesus wept and died for me;
Jesus suffered on the tree;
Jesus waits to make me free,
He alone can save me.

Working will not save me—
Purest deeds that I can do,
Holiest thoughts and feelings too,
Cannot form my soul anew—
Working will not save me.

Waiting will not save me—
Helpless, guilty, lost I lie
In my ear is mercy’s cry;
If I wail, I can but die—
Waiting will not save me.

Faith in Christ will save me—
Let me trust thy weeping Son,
Trust the work that He has done;
To his arms, Lord, help me run—
Faith in Christ will save me.


This song came to my attention while I was preparing my article about “Nothing but the Blood.” The song was listed among Robert Lowry’s most popular hymns, but I had never heard of it. Even so, the title intrigued me enough to want to look it up and learn more. After reading it, I can see why it was a popular hymn. The message of salvation is crystal clear, and the words are very singable.

You can read Robert Lowry’s biography here, and below is an instrumental recording of the tune with the lyrics subbed on the video, just in case you’re curious enough to want to know how the song was sung.

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

Overcoming Self-Doubt

When insecurities start to make you doubt, flip it around and say, “God, I may doubt myself, but I will not doubt You. So I will let Your perfection override my feelings of imperfection and do what You instruct me.” —Lysa TerKeurst

 

Philippians 4:13 I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me.